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WHO endorses the first malaria vaccine

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WHO endorse the first malaria vaccine developed by Africans

WHO endorses the first malaria vaccine?

The World Health Organization has endorsed the first malaria vaccine to be used in children. This first malaria vaccine was developed by African Scientists and is 95% effective according to W.H.O.

Over 260,000 children in Africa die of Malaria every year. Malaria is a common disease in Africa that kills nearly 500,000 people every year and the majority are children below 6years old.

WHO endorses the first malaria vaccine

Malaria kills thousands of people every year. This vaccine was made in Africa by African scientists. Malaria kills than any other disease in Africa. Malaria parasites are caused by mosquitoes.

 

The World Health Organization Boss said he is proud an African scientist developed this vaccine. He recommends using the Mosquirix vaccine to save African children from perishing.

 

The World Health Organization says that over 90% of malaria cases occur in Africa, Africa is a population of 1.3billion people. Malaria is a preventable disease caused by parasites spread to people by the bite of a contaminated mosquito.

 

Some of the symptoms of malaria include Headache, Chills, Fever, and body weakness. 90% of Malaria cases in Africa are caused by plasmodium falciparum.

 

Mosquirix Vaccine is also for parasitic diseases not just for malaria. Sleep in a well-treated Mosquito net to prevent you and your family from malaria.

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WHO says that the Mosquirix vaccine can save thousands of lives every year. In severe cases, this approved vaccine is 30% effective.

WHO endorses the first malaria vaccine

Support challenge

Health Analyst says that the greatest support challenge is to organizing financing for the production and distribution of the vaccine to some of the poor African Countries.

 

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