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How to Plant a Sprouted Onion in 6 Easy Steps

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How to Plant a Sprouted Onion
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How to Plant a Sprouted Onion in 6 Easy Steps

How to Plant a Sprouted Onion in 6 Easy Steps? Sprouted onions, also known as green onions, green shallots, or scallions are easy to grow at home.

 

Follow this guide to learn how to plant and grow sprouted onions from the root to get that sweet onion flavor you love in your dishes.

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step 1: Set up an area for your sprouts
Onions are best grown indoors, where it’s warm and there’s plenty of light. A sprouted onion needs about 12 hours of daylight each day, so if you don’t have that many hours of sunlight in your home, use artificial light and grow it near a window.

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Choose an area with good drainage and rich soil that doesn’t contain pesticides or fertilizers. Make sure there is room for growth onions can get quite large. You can also grow them outside if you live in an area with long enough seasons.

 

  • Selecting seeds: You can buy seeds online or at most gardening stores, but I prefer to save money by growing my own from last year’s onions.

 

To do so, select large onions and leave them out on your counter until they begin to sprout. This will take several weeks, depending on how warm your house is. Once sprouts appear, cut off any green leaves and plant them in moist soil. The remaining part of the onion will continue to produce more sprouts.

 

  •  Prepare your bed: Fill a bucket or container with composted dirt (you can find bags of composted dirt at nurseries).

 

Add water until it’s moistened all through but not soggy; let sit overnight to drain excess water. Then add another layer of dirt. Repeat until you have added four layers total.

How to Plant a Sprouted Onion

If you need help estimating how much soil to buy, place your bucket on top of some newspaper and fill it with water until it reaches three inches from the top. Then remove the bucket and measure how much paper was soaked up by the water; that’s how much soil you need to purchase.

 

Don’t worry too much about measuring precisely just estimate how high you want your onion to be and make sure to give yourself extra space. You can always move things around later.

 

  •  Plant your seedling: Take one of your seedlings, keeping as much of its root system intact as possible, and plant it into one corner of your box using a trowel or shovel.

 

Place it at least six inches below ground level and cover it with soil. Be careful not to bury it too deep, though you should still be able to see two inches of stem when you’re done.

 

Water well. Continue planting new seedlings every few days until your bed is full. Each new plant should be placed slightly above and next to its predecessor so that they grow together naturally.

 

  •  Wait: After planting, leave your sprouted onions alone for a month while they establish themselves in their new environment. Check back after a month and pull back some of the soil to check their progress. If everything looks good, keep watering regularly.

 

They’ll start to flower after about five months. In warmer climates, you may even be able to harvest small onions within just three months.

 

  •  After about eight months, your sprouted onions will be ready for harvest. Pull them up carefully by their roots and wash them thoroughly before eating.

 

You can replant your onions again, or try something different. There are lots of varieties of sprouted onions you can grow.

 

If you’re looking for a change, try red sprouted onions or yellow sprouted onions. These are often available in supermarkets during spring and summer.

 

step 2: Soak the seeds overnight
Place your onion seeds in a cup of water and allow them to soak overnight. The following day, rinse them off and discard any that didn’t sprout.

 

Once you have rinsed away all of the seeds that did not sprout, place your onion seeds on top of moistened paper towels for about 2-3 days.

 

Keep them out of direct sunlight but make sure they are able to receive plenty of indirect light each day. During these two or three days, keep an eye on your onion seeds and ensure that they stay moist by gently misting them with water if needed. Be careful not to over-water as it can cause rot.

 

If you need to go somewhere during these first few days, don’t worry! Just place your onion seeds inside of a plastic baggie before leaving so they don’t dry out.

 

 

After about 2-3 days, most of your onions should have germinated. It is normal for some to take longer than others.

 

At this point, you will want to plant your onion seeds in the soil. To do so, simply take one of your newly sprouted onions and carefully remove its outermost layer using a knife or scissors. You may want to wear gloves at this point since handling the onion could irritate your skin.

 

Next, dig a small hole (about 1/2 inch deep) in your garden bed and place your onion seed inside. Pat down lightly to secure it and then cover with soil. Water well after planting.

 

For optimal growth, try to maintain even moisture around your onions and avoid overwatering. As they grow taller, be sure to give them enough space between each other so that their leaves do not touch.

 

This will help prevent the disease from spreading among your plants. When you see flower stalks beginning to appear above ground level, know that it is time to harvest.

 

Simply cut off the flower stalks when they reach approximately 8 inches tall and use as desired. Some people like to eat them while others prefer to let them continue growing until they form bulbs underground.

How to Plant a Sprouted Onion

step 3: Soak Once Every Day
Soak your onions once every day for 10 days. This will accelerate their germination, and after 10 days you should see some sprouts.

 

If you’re short on time, or just want to cut down on work, you can choose an accelerated germination method and start seeing sprouts within 3-4 days.

 

To do so, fill a large bowl with warm water (about 100 degrees Fahrenheit) and place your onion halves inside. Cover them with plastic wrap and leave them at room temperature for three days. After three days, remove from water and let dry out for 12 hours before returning to soak again.

 

The reason we use warm water is that cold temperatures inhibit germination. The reason we cover our onions is that they need darkness to begin growing roots. The reason we use plastic wrap is that it allows moisture to escape but keeps light out.

 

By covering our onions in both light and moisture, we avert them from being over-watered while also preventing algae growth that might occur if left uncovered in a dark environment.

 

You don’t have to worry about changing the water just make sure it stays warm. When choosing a location for your onions, keep in mind that even though they are indoors, sunlight will affect them.

 

Choose a spot where there is plenty of indirect sunlight; try near a window but not directly underneath it. Also keep in mind that even though these plants are small, they still need plenty of space between each other as well as around each plant. They like lots of airflows and fresh air.

 

Be careful when watering your onions that you don’t get any water on their leaves. Watering from above could cause rot, which would kill your little guys.

 

Watering from below could cause mold, which would also kill them! It’s best to use a spray bottle or mister and mist only their soil surface.

 

Make sure you aren’t overwatering either sprout that grows best in moist soil, but too much water can drown them. Just remember: damp, not wet. Once your sprouts have grown to about 1/2 inch tall, it’s time to transplant them into bigger pots.

 

step 4: Choose where you want to plant them
The first step in planting your sprouted onions is choosing where you want to plant them. Because they take some time to grow and mature, it’s important that you take some time planning out their location ahead of time. Ideally, you should choose an area with plenty of sunlight and warmth.

 

If possible, try to find an area that has been recently tilled or worked on this will help ensure easy growth for your onions. However, if you can’t find such an area, don’t worry; as long as there is plenty of sunlight and warmth available (along with good drainage), there are other ways to ensure successful growth.

 

When deciding where to plant your sprouted onions, make sure you pick an area that isn’t prone to flooding and doesn’t have any nearby chemicals or pollutants.

 

It may also be a good idea to avoid areas with lots of dogs and/or cats; although many pet owners claim their animals won’t eat onion plants, it doesn’t hurt to play it safe when growing something in close proximity to pets. If you live in an apartment building, it’s probably best to keep your sprouted onions outside.

Remembering which type of onion you planted: One thing that makes planting sprouted onions unique from most other types of plants is remembering which type of onion you planted.

 

In order to properly water and care for your new plants, it’s vital that you remember which kind of onion you planted at each site so that every part gets watered evenly.

 

If you aren’t sure what type of onion you planted in each area, just take a quick look at their leaves; if they have rounder leaves (like shallots), then it’s likely that you have an onion plant. If they have long, skinny leaves (like green onions), then it’s likely that you have some sort of leek plant.

 

However, if you aren’t sure about either option, feel free to pull up one of your sprouted onions and check its roots if they are white or yellowish-white with lots of little hairs on them, then it’s probably an onion plant.

 

If they are more pale pink or light brown with fewer hairs on them, then it might be a leek plant instead. Although it may seem like a pain to keep track of all these different plants, it’s actually very easy once you get used to doing it.

 

It only takes a few minutes when watering your plants anyway, so don’t worry too much about getting everything right.

The best time to plant sprouted onions: The best time to plant sprouted onions depends largely on where you live and how quickly temperatures rise during springtime.

 

5. Choose where you want to plant them
The first step in planting your sprouted onions is choosing where you want to plant them. Because they take some time to grow and mature, it’s important that you take some time planning out their location ahead of time. Ideally, you should choose an area with plenty of sunlight and warmth.

 

If possible, try to find an area that has been recently tilled or worked on this will help ensure easy growth for your onions. However, if you can’t find such an area, don’t worry; as long as there is plenty of sunlight and warmth available (along with good drainage), there are other ways to ensure successful growth.

 

When deciding where to plant your sprouted onions, make sure you pick an area that isn’t prone to flooding and doesn’t have any nearby chemicals or pollutants.

 

It may also be a good idea to avoid areas with lots of dogs and/or cats; although many pet owners claim their animals won’t eat onion plants, it doesn’t hurt to play it safe when growing something in close proximity to pets.

 

If you live in an apartment building, it’s probably best to keep your sprouted onions outside.
Remembering which type of onion you planted: One thing that makes planting sprouted onions unique from most other types of plants is remembering which type of onion you planted.

 

In order to properly water and care for your new plants, it’s vital that you remember which kind of onion you planted at each site so that every part gets watered evenly.

 

If you aren’t sure what type of onion you planted in each area, just take a quick look at their leaves; if they have rounder leaves (like shallots), then it’s likely that you have an onion plant. If they have long, skinny leaves (like green onions), then it’s likely that you have some sort of leek plant.

 

However, if you aren’t sure about either option, feel free to pull up one of your sprouted onions and check its roots if they are white or yellowish-white with lots of little hairs on them, then it’s probably an onion plant.

 

If they are more pale pink or light brown with fewer hairs on them, then it might be a leek plant instead. Although it may seem like a pain to keep track of all these different plants, it’s actually very easy once you get used to doing it.

 

It only takes a few minutes when watering your plants anyway, so don’t worry too much about getting everything right.

 

The best time to plant sprouted onions: The best time to plant sprouted onions depends largely on where you live and how quickly temperatures rise during springtime.

 

step 5: Transplanting
As soon as your sprouts begin growing roots, you can transfer them into your garden. The best time of year for transplanting is either in fall or spring.

 

Be sure to only transplant sprouts that have developed at least two sets of leaves; younger sprouts aren’t as sturdy, and they won’t survive being transplanted.

 

Dig holes about twice as deep as your onion bulbs are tall, then set each bulb in its own hole with about 2 inches of space between them. Cover with soil, pat down gently, and water well. If you don’t want to plant your onions right away, keep them in their pots until it’s time to move them outdoors.

 

Just be sure to water regularly so they don’t dry out. When you do finally plant them outside, cover their tops with an inch or two of mulch to help protect against frost damage during cold weather.

 

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My audience is anyone who wants to learn how to plant a sprouted onion. My target audience will be people who live in areas where there are four seasons because people who live in areas where there are four seasons know what planting season is when they see it.

 

People who live in areas where there are four seasons know what planting season is when they see it.

 

6. Keeping your plants hydrated

It’s important that your plants have plenty of water. If you keep your potted plants indoors, you should make sure they’re near a sink or outside where there is easy access to water.

 

Also, be sure that they don’t get so much water that their roots rot and they die. If possible, add an osmosis plant tonic weekly to keep your greenery healthy.