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How to Cut Parsley – Step by Step

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How to Cut Parsley - Step by Step

How to Cut Parsley – Step by Step

Parsley makes an excellent garnish or addition to your favorite dishes, but how should you go about cutting it? By hand? With a knife? It turns out that there are plenty of ways to cut parsley, and each can affect the taste of the final product.

 

In this guide, you’ll learn three different methods for cutting parsley, along with their pros and cons. Which method do you prefer? Let us know in the comments.

 

Rinse the parsley well
First, you’ll want to rinse your parsley well under running water. This will help get rid of any dirt or debris stuck in its leaves. Many people skip this step and end up with a mouthful of grit in their final dish, so take care not to make that mistake. It’s also important to note that some varieties of parsley are grown with sandy soil, which can be hard to wash off.

 

For these types, it may be best to use a vegetable brush or rub each leaf gently between your fingers before rinsing it off. The next steps depend on how you plan to cut your parsley: if you’re using a knife, hold one side of a leaf flat against your cutting board while slicing horizontally along its length; if using scissors, trim one side of each stem before making cuts perpendicular to it.

How to Cut Parsley - Step by Step

How to Cut Parsley – Step by Step

Regardless of how you decide to do it, keep in mind that all parts of parsley (except for its roots) are edible. So even after you’ve made your cuts, consider saving what’s leftover for later. You can store parsley in an airtight container in your refrigerator for up to two weeks.

 

If you have more than you need, try adding it to soups, stews, sauces, and salads it adds a fresh flavor and is especially good when paired with citrusy ingredients like lemon juice or vinegar. Or throw it into sandwiches, burgers, or tacos as a healthy alternative to lettuce.

 

Experiment with different ways of using parsley until you find your favorite way to incorporate it into your dishes. And remember: just because most recipes call for curly parsley doesn’t mean they won’t taste great with flat-leaf variety instead! They look different but they both have the same bold flavor and bright color.

Read Also: How to properly dry parsley and why you should

Whether you’re looking to add a bit of pizzazz to your dinner table or trying out new flavors in your cooking, there are plenty of delicious ways to enjoy parsley. Just don’t forget about how easy it is to grow and how quickly it comes back year after year. That’s right parsley is actually considered an herb, not a vegetable. It grows easily from seed and requires very little maintenance once established, making it a perfect addition to any home garden. So why not plant some now?

 

Cut off the bottom end, including roots
The bottom, or root-end, of parsley, should be cut off. The roots are bitter and don’t taste good when you eat them; for aesthetic purposes you want them removed before plating. Some people also believe that leaving them on will cause your dish to spoil faster.

 

Once you have cut off both ends, place it flat side down on a cutting board and slice it into strips from top to bottom using a sharp knife (be sure not to include any of those pesky roots). If you have curly parsley, roll it up like a cigar first then slice it into strips.

 

This will give your dish a much more appealing presentation. Repeat with remaining parsley. Be sure to wash your hands thoroughly after handling raw parsley so as not to contaminate other foods with their strong aroma and flavor.

 

Parsley is great for garnishing plates but has many other uses in cooking as well. It can be used in soups, stews, sauces, and even salads. It pairs especially well with fish, poultry, and potatoes. Be sure to include it in your next meal.

 

A common myth surrounding parsley is that its strong aroma and flavor can be imparted to other foods, causing them to spoil faster. This may have been true in earlier times when preservation methods were not as advanced as they are today. Today it’s safe to say that parsley won’t cause your food to spoil faster; in fact, adding it at some point during cooking will actually help preserve your meal because of its many antioxidant properties.

 

Strip off stems
To strip parsley leaves off their stems, place several leaves in one hand. Then, using your opposite hand, grab a leaf and roll it down as if you’re trying to roll it into a straw. Keep rolling until most of the parsley is detached from its stem. Repeat with other leaves until you’ve removed all of them from their stems.

How to Cut Parsley

How to Cut Parsley

Separate leaves into sprigs
Clean and de-stem parsley, then separate leaves into sprigs. If a recipe calls for curly parsley, you can even curl each sprig with your fingers or a pair of kitchen shears. It’s easier to do when leaves are dry but if they’re in the water as you clean them, soak them in another bowl before transferring them to dry paper towels.

 

You don’t want wet parsley clumping together. A bit of brown is fine; too much means it has been sitting around too long.

 

Oven-dry: Spread sprigs on a rimmed baking sheet lined with parchment paper (you can also use nonstick foil). This will take an hour or so at 200 degrees F, but check every 20 minutes to make sure leaves aren’t drying out too much (you may need to rotate baking sheets halfway through). Let cool completely before storing in an airtight container at room temperature.

 

If you do it right, parsley should last for about two weeks. If it starts to turn yellowish-green, it’s time to toss it and start over. Most recipes call for chopped parsley but there are times when a recipe specifically calls for one of these methods. Learn about how to harvest parsley

 

In either case, here’s how to cut parsley like a pro: Oven-dry: Spread sprigs on a rimmed baking sheet lined with parchment paper (you can also use nonstick foil). This will take an hour or so at 200 degrees F, but check every 20 minutes to make sure leaves aren’t drying out too much (you may need to rotate baking sheets halfway through).

 

Let cool completely before storing in an airtight container at room temperature. If you do it right, parsley should last for about two weeks. If it starts to turn yellowish-green, it’s time to toss it and start over. Most recipes call for chopped parsley but there are times when a recipe specifically calls for one of these methods.

 

In either case, here’s how to cut parsley like a pro: Oven-dry: Spread sprigs on a rimmed baking sheet lined with parchment paper (you can also use nonstick foil). This will take an hour or so at 200 degrees F, but check every 20 minutes to make sure leaves aren’t drying out too much (you may need to rotate baking sheets halfway through).

 

Let cool completely before storing in an airtight container at room temperature. If you do it right, parsley should last for about two weeks.

 

Chop leaves in half lengthwise
There’s no need to prep parsley with a chef’s knife; simply chop it into two-inch sections. To do so, place one hand on top of your bunch and, using a chef’s knife in your other hand, cut off both ends of each stem. Then line up those parsley stems together and slice them in half lengthwise. You can then either lay those leaf halves flat on your cutting board or roll them up as you would celery stalks.

 

. This method allows for more even chopping. (You can also use these leaves for garnishing plates.) Your last step is to finely mince: After slicing your leaves in half, place them flat side down on your cutting board and chop away. Learn How to store parsley

 

A general rule of thumb is that you should aim for mince-size pieces you don’t want big chunks because they won’t get fully distributed throughout whatever dish you’re making. If some pieces are smaller than others, that’s okay.

How to Cut Parsley

How to Cut Parsley

Just try to make sure everything is about the same size. Once you’ve chopped all your leaves, give them a good rinse under cold water to wash away any dirt. The final product will be ready for use in recipes like salads, pasta dishes, soups, and sauces. It will keep in an airtight container in your refrigerator for three days before the parsley goes bad.

 

Finely chop leaves, stems, and root ends
Before you cut parsley, wash and dry it thoroughly. Make sure any dirt or debris is removed. When you’re cutting parsley, use a very sharp knife. If your blade isn’t sharp enough, it will bruise and crush instead of cut through and that’s not what we want at all! Once your knife is properly prepared, finely chop leaves, stems, and root ends.

 

Continue chopping parsley until you have uniform pieces. The smaller you chop your parsley, the easier it will be to incorporate into recipes. It’s best to store chopped parsley in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to five days.

 

You can also freeze chopped parsley for longer storage (up to six months). Just remember: Frozen herbs should never be thawed and refrozen again; always cook with fresh herbs whenever possible. Parsley adds flavor and visual appeal to dishes like rice pilaf, soups, sauces, and salads. To help boost flavor without adding extra calories or fat, add parsley just before serving so its flavor stays intact.

 

In addition to its uses as a food additive and garnish, parsley has been used throughout history as both a medicinal herb and decoration. As far back as ancient Greece, people were using parsley to treat stomachaches and headaches.

 

More recently, Italian researchers found that eating large amounts of parsley may reduce some types of cancer risk. While more research needs to be done on how exactly parsley fights disease, there are many other reasons why incorporating more of it into your diet might be beneficial. For example, it’s high in vitamins A and C as well as folate, which helps prevent heart disease and cancer.

 

And if you suffer from bloating or gas after meals, try chewing on a sprig of parsley after every meal for several weeks—it might do wonders for your digestion.

 

Serve or store
It’s important to know how to cut parsley in both ways. If you’re cooking with it and want a brighter, more concentrated flavor, chop the parsley finely and add it to your recipe just before serving. Store any extra in a plastic baggie or wrap it in a damp paper towel and store it in your refrigerator for up to two weeks. You can also freeze chopped parsley; place it in an airtight container and freeze for up to six months.

 

To use frozen parsley, thaw it overnight in your refrigerator and then use it as needed. When cooking with parsley, don’t discard the stems. The stems contain many of parsley’s nutrients and are perfectly edible in fact, they may even have a better flavor than their leafy counterparts.

 

To remove them easily without damaging other parts of your parsley plant, simply hold one end of a stem between your thumb and forefinger while pinching from either side at its base until it snaps off. This will keep you from pulling off additional leaves along with it. Keep in mind that if you plan on using all of your parsley, be sure to pick only as much as you need.

How to Cut Parsley

How to Cut Parsley

Otherwise, if left alone too long after being picked, it can become bitter and lose some of its essential oils. So unless you plan on using all of it right away (or freezing some), harvest only what you need each time you pick some fresh from your garden. Do not wash: Freshly harvested parsley is actually clean enough that washing is unnecessary.

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